DANIEL DENNETT

Andrew Brook and Don Ross, eds.



Table of Contents

Acknowledgements

Introduction

Dennett's Place in the Intellectual World, Andrew Brook and Don Ross

Consciousness

The Appearance of Things, Andrew Brook

Catching Consciousness in a Recurrent Net, Paul M. Churchland

Uses of Dennett's Method

The Intentional Stance: developmental and neurocognitive perspectives, Richard Griffin and Simon Baron-Cohen

Dennett's contribution to research on the animal mind, Robert M. Seyfarth and Dorothy L. Cheney

Dennettian Behavioural Explanations and the Roles of the Social Sciences, Don Ross

Two Concerns

That Special Something: Dennett on the Making of Minds and Selves, Andy Clark

A Question of Content, Kathleen Akins

Artificial Intelligence and Evolutionary Theory

Dennett and Artificial Intelligence: On the Same Side, and If So, of What?, Yorick Wilks

Dennett and the Darwin Wars, Don Ross



Acknowledgements



We would like first to acknowledge the vision of Cambridge University Press and their New York Executive Editor for the Humanities, Terence Moore, for creating the unique series of which this volume is a part. May it make a difference!

Though Dan Dennett has had no part in this volume and indeed has not even seen most of the essays in it, we would like to thank him for two things. First, for the originality and generativity of his thought over the past thirty-five years. Second, for the generosity with which he has helped so many researchers, including many of the contributors to this volume, to find their own way. (Where Dan Dennett has seen a chapter in this volume, it because the chapter was part of an ongoing research activity of some kind in which he is involved.)

We would like to thank the contributors most warmly. Every essay in the volume is new.(1) It says a great deal, about the author and about Dan Dennett, that some very busy people much in demand in their own right would take the time to prepare a special paper for this volume.

Finally, we acknowledge with gratitude and fondness the indispensable role of our partners, Christine Koggel (Bryn Mawr College) and Nelleke Bak (University of the Western Cape). That they are willing to put up with our various ventures is in no small part because their own professional lives are occupied with just as many ventures of their own.



A. B.

Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

D.R.

University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa











Introduction

1. A portion of Chapter 10 appeared previously in Biology and Philosophy 16:251-260, and is reproduced with permission.