CULTIVATION AND PROPAGATION OF RICE IN NORTHEAST CHINA

(Abstract)

 

ZHAO, Yongguang

(Chinese Drinking and Eating Cultural Institute, Helongjiang University, Harbin, PR China)

ZHANG, Zhili

(Jilin Provincial Cultural Research Institute, Changchun, Jilin, PR China)

 

(Agricultural Archaeology 1998(1):409. Transl/interp. by Dr. W. Tsao, 06/13/01; edited by B. Gordon)

 

        NE China rice cultivation began in the Bronze Age, >2000 years earlier than Korean Peninsula. Eastern spread of rice cultivation from lower Yangtze River, Shandong, Liaodong and Korean Peninsulas, Japanese Kyushu and Honshu, had NE China as a mid-point, involving mainly land transportation and a short sea voyage.

 

        NE China rice cultivation grew widely in Han Dynasty. In Tang Dynasty’s (698-926) Bohai period the famous "Lucheng rice" was bred successfully in Zhongjing, while rice was widely planted in Liaodong and part of Shangjing in Jin Dynasty,.

 

        Modern rice farming in NE China began after prohibition in 1860. Han, Korean and Manchu rice farmers worked hard to open new fields, improved cultivation and bred several new varieties.