Introduction

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Outline



Introduction:

  • This web-based project explores the internet as a tool to facilitate controversial debates such as the sealhunt. The contemporary period has been described as risk society. Environmental risks were once considered to be manageable byproducts of industry. However, public concerns over an increasingly unmanageable global environmental crisis, have resulted in successful protests against Big science, Big industry, Big government and even globalization itself. But protestors sometimes overlook the more complex issues such as the impact on the lives of environmental refugees.

  • This project explores how the nonlinear, polyvocal nature of the internet might allow for different, even conflictual viewpoints to work in tandem for a better, more sophisticated response to complex issues. This project operates within a structure of self-reflexive, critical examination of hypertext, hypermedia and internet tools used. The goal of this project is not to find clear-cut answers. The goal is to find more appropriate questions for complex issues.

  • Hypertext blurs the boundaries between author and reader, analyses and writing, researcher and observed. How messy can it get before it is unmanageable?

  • Visual arguments have been used in animal rights debates. Can the visual arts, with a focus on Inuit art, effectively inform the debates? Is there an ethical issue related to this: the poetics and politics of representation?

  • Can the observed have an equal voice? What are the ethical questions involved in representing differing viewpoints, particularly when one is the aboriginal voice which was muted or mis-represented and is now shifting into proactive stance? This leads to questions of knowledge management? Whose knowledge counts? Who can make knowledge claims?

  • The relationships between language, power and knowledge: who influences public policies that impact on society? Who listens? How will new media transform the opraphication of America? Television allows for "town hall discussions" where emotional, subjective personal testimonies counterbalance, and sometimes outweigh, the testimonies of knowledge experts (scientists, professionals, professors)? Can the internet lead to an even greater democratic participation with a more informed citizenry?







Risks to animals/environmant/nature webliography/bibiliography/citations animal rights/human rights Risks to humans glossary/definitions/ why hypertext?debates/methods who's who who's who? visual thesis








Outline

ETHICS

  • RISK SOCIETY

  • RISKS AND RIGHTS

  • KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT

  • LANGUAGE/KNOWLEDGE/POWER

  • WHO INFLUENCES PUBLIC POLICIES THAT IMPACT ON SOCIETY?

    The case of Akesuk

  • WHOSE KNOWLEDGE COUNTS?

  • WHO CAN MAKE KNOWLEDGE CLAIMS?

  • WHO LISTENS?

  • KNOWLEDGE EXPERTS

  • PARTICIPATORY DEMOCRACY

  • SUMMARY







  • HOME | ANIMAL RIGHTS | ARTISTS | BIBLIOGRAPHY | CALENDAR INUIT | CHRONOLOGY | CITATIONS | GLOSSARY | WHY HYPERTEXT? | INDEX | INTRODUCTION | MAPS | OONARK | SMITH AND THE WHALE | THUMBNAILS | RISKS | VIEWPOINT | WEBLIOGRAPHY | WHO'S WHO? | AUTHOR | CONTACT




    Maureen Flynn-Burhoe 2000. Last updated web design (not content) February 2002. Contact for comments, corrections and copyright.